Monday, December 2, 2013

Climber's Elbow- 2- by Eric Horst

Please read the full article first as I picked up only a few here.
Eric J Horst instructs

Extensors Stretch
injury-forearm-extensor_stretch
Hold this stretch for twenty seconds.

Flexors Stretch
injury-forearm-flexor-stretch-1
Left: for about twenty seconds.                                                                       Right:Hold for ten seconds.
Finish up with a minute of self-massage to the forearm flexor muscles using deep cross-fibre friction

Pronators
injury-pronators
Summary Tips for Treating Elbow Tendinosis
Turn your hand inward (pronation) to lift the hammer to the vertical position. Stop here. Now, slowly lower the hammer back to the starting position. Stop at the horizontal position for one second before beginning the next repetition. Continue lifting the hammer in this way for fifteen to twenty repetitions. Choke up on the hammer if this feels overly difficult. Perform two sets with each hand.
1. Cease climbing and sport-specific training.
2. Apply ice to the injured area and take NSAID medications only if the injury produces visible or palpable swelling (most elbow tendinopathy does not). Cease use of ice and NSAIDs as soon as swelling diminishes—further use will slow healing.
3. Never use NSAIDs to mask pain in order to continue climbing while injured. Regular use of NSAIDS (and smoking) may actually weaken tendons!
4. If no swelling is present, begin mild stretching, light massage, and use of a heating pad (ten to fifteen minutes) three times per day. Most important is twice-daily use of the forearm stretches shown above.
5. If no swelling is present and if pain is minor, engage in rehabilitative exercises on an every-other-day basis. Perform some warm-up activities such as arm circles, finger flexions, massage, or use of a heating pad. Use Reverse Wrist Curls for lateral tendinosis and Forearm Pronators for medial tendinosis.

6. Cautiously return to climbing when your elbow is painfree and no sooner then after two to four weeks of strength training exercise. Begin with easy, foot-oriented climbing for the first few weeks and limit use of the crimp grip. Cease climbing if you experience pain while climbing and immediately return to Step 2.